Spatial Coordination in SMC

Much More Than Just Clash Detection

This article is intended to show examples of Spatial Coordination issues that may typically be missed by more basic Clash Detection checks, and might remain undetected until construction. Solibri Model Checker (SMC) differentiates between different object types and their respective requirements instead of simply looking for locations of “generic” clashes. This allows the user more flexibility in specifying which elements are to be checked.

Below are some examples. The small model used to show examples for this article is available here: Coordination_Example_Model.smc

Two Doors in a Series
Two Doors in a Series

This is an example of a coordination issue that would be missed in most circumstances.   While the two doors appear to be OK when closed (as they are modeled), SMC detects that the distance between them when opened is not large enough to satisfy the design requirements.   The user has the flexibility to modify the parameters within any rule template, in order to meet the established requirements.

Clearance in Front of Windows
Clearance in Front of Windows

The image above is showing an issue that resulted from a rule that checks clearances in front of, or behind components.  In this example, a column is shown within the required clearance space in front of a window obscuring the view.  Again, this rule is defined by the user, and can be used in many different circumstances, such as checking for appropriate clearance for access to utility or service panels, or electrical cabinets.

Clearance of Light Fixtures
Clearance of Light Fixtures

SMC has many different rules and requirements that can be adjusted, modified and customized.  This issue identifies a light hanging too low to meet the head clearance requirements. This rule could be used in other ways; for example, a check for distance of light fixtures from ceiling components would identify any lights that are too far away from any ceiling, and are likely placed incorrectly or need to be moved.

Intersecting Components
Intersecting Components

Identified in the above check is an issue that appears to be a ‘Hard Clash’, but in SMC the user can be very specific about what types of components to check.   For example, this rule can be configured to only check between Walls and some specific type of component.  In this image, a lighting panel board is recessed deeply within the wall.  Not only does SMC identify the problem, it also reports the total area of the intersecting components, so these measurements can be used for more accurate Takeoffs and estimates.

Related Issues of a Wall
Related Issues of a Wall

To make Spatial Coordination as easy as possible, a user can choose to review the checking results from the Checking Window as they are generated in SMC, or, they can select an object and choose the Issues tab in the Info window. Above is the Issues list related to a single wall object (Wall.0.2). This can be a very powerful tool for organizing issues and making decisions about what components need to be moved or remodeled.

Spatial Coordination is more of a space analysis process than just clash detection. SMC recognizes that not all spaces are equal (i.e. a classroom differs from a hallway, or a hospital operating room). This ‘logic’ makes it possible for SMC to identify issues, and relationships that would directly impact the building.

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Spatial Coordination in SMC

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