Why Result Counts can vary in the General Intersection Rule

The Results view in Solibri Model Checker (SMC) organizes issue results by category and provides the number of how many results within a category have been handled by approving or rejecting them and the total count of results for that category.  When running a check of the General Intersection rule, the categories of the results are grouped by components, systems, and types.

The following article demonstrates how the results are grouped and also explains why different counts of results are listed depending on what you have specified in the Component 1 vs the Component 2 filter parameters tables.  The model below consists of 3 files: an HVAC, Structural, and Electrical model with general intersection rules checking each model against one another.  You can download this sample model to follow along through the link below:

General Intersection Rule – Comp1 vs Comp2 Tests.smc

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In the Checking view, you’ll find that the Structural vs Electrical rule has been run and result counts are listed. For instance, there are 40 unhandled results of Beams intersecting components in the Electrical model.

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The Rule Parameters (below) have any component from the Structural model listed in the Component 1 filter parameter table and any component from the Electrical model listed in the Component 2 filter parameter table.

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If you select the Electrical vs Structural rule, you’ll find that there are 62 unhandled results listed.

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In the Rule parameters, Component 1 and Component 2 were swapped, and any component from the Electrical model is listed in the Component 1 filter parameters table while any component from the Structural model is listed in the Component 2 filter parameters table.

Rest assured that even though the result counts differ, no results were missed in the Structural vs Electrical rule. When you expand the categories of the Intersections of Beam to the first result, you see that three light fixtures (2.108, 2.217, and 2.218) are grouped along with Beam.1.100, which those light fixtures intersect.

This is due to having the Structural model listed as Component 1 in the rule parameters.  In the rule parameters of the general intersection rule, components listed in the Component 2 filter parameter table will be group together under a result with the component from Component 1 that they intersect.

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When you expand the results under Intersection of Beams for the Electrical vs Structural rule, you see that there is an individual result for each light fixture that intersects Beam.1.100.
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Generally, you find lower result counts and more grouping of components when the components listed in Component 1 are larger than those in Component 2.  Components in Structural models such as beams, columns, and slabs are larger than components in an Electrical model such as light fixtures, electrical panels, and electrical outlets. Therefore, it is more likely that a single component from the Structural will have intersections with multiple components from the Electrical model, which explain why we see 40 results rather than 62.

You may also find a mixture of grouped and ungrouped components. Below is a check of HVAC vs Electrical. Since HVAC components are listed in the Component 1 filter parameter table, each duct and duct fitting intersecting with Cable Carrier 1.15 has its own result.

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If you swap the Component 1 and Component 2 filter parameter tables as in the rule parameters of Electrical vs HVAC, then the three results are reduced to one.

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However, recall that light fixtures are relatively small in size and duct in the HVAC model is similar geometrically to the beams found in the structural model. Hence, grouping by HVAC components allows for a single result where two light fixtures intersect Duct.1.16.

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Therefore, having HVAC components listed in the Component 1 filter parameter table may yield more result counts for intersections of long sections of cable tray, but less for individual light fixtures.

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Having a general idea of how results will be grouped depending on what is listed in the Component 1 and Component 2 filter parameter tables can save you time when reviewing results.

Also, you don’t need to check everything in one discipline against everything in another in just one rule.  For instance, you could check only cable trays against everything in your HVAC model in one rule, and then check everything in your HVAC model against everything in the Electrical model, excluding cable trays. As seen in the results above, this will reduce the number of results.

Lastly, there are tips and tricks for coordination and issue management such as right-clicking a component to show all component issues and viewing issues a component has in the Info view.  These topics are discussed in the article Solibri Model Checker (SMC) Workflow Tips & Tricks.

 

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Why Result Counts can vary in the General Intersection Rule

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